Culture

How to counter Artificial Intelligence bias?

We frequently discuss the revolutionary impact of artificial intelligence (AI) as numerous entities, ranging from governments to corporations, rush to harness AI in various sectors like recruitment, policing, criminal justice, healthcare, product development, and marketing. Generative tools such as Chat GPT have also become a staple in our daily digital interactions. However, Ruhi Khan, a researcher at the London School of Economics (LSE) Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), casts a spotlight on a critical issue: despite the strides in AI, its embedded gender and racial biases significantly endanger women. Khan is championing a worldwide feminist movement to confront these challenges by promoting awareness, inclusivity, and regulatory measures. But does AI genuinely harbor ...

Harmony in Essence: The Symbiosis of Women and Nature in Ecofeminism

From the dawn of time, the natural world has been esteemed as the “Mother of Nature”, a moniker that transcends simple designation to deeply affirm the intrinsic bond between women and the wild. This unique kinship, spanning the annals of time from archaic matriarchal societies to our contemporary era, is a recurring motif across diverse cultures and legends. In the rich tapestry of myths both in the East and the West, women have consistently been portrayed as custodians, healers, and creators of the natural realm. Take, for instance, Demeter in Greek mythology, consort to Zeus and the goddess of harvest and fecundity, who infused the earth with vitality and bestowed upon mankind the wisdom of agriculture. In Hindu lore, Parvati, the mountain goddess and sister to the Ganges deity, emb...

Performance Art is Happening: FURNACE #2

You will become a part of the happenings;you will simultaneously experience them Allan Kaprow The Genesis of Performance Art In 1959, American artist Allan Kaprow sent out invitations for his debut show at Reuben Gallery with a captivating proposition: “You will become a part of the happenings; you will simultaneously experience them.” He described the show as “something spontaneous, something that just happens to happen”. The audience, unaware of what awaited them, arrived at the venue with only one instruction: no smoking or leaving during the event. Upon reaching the second floor of the gallery, they were given detailed directives, orchestrating their seating and movements across three segmented spaces of the gallery. This format allowed viewers to adopt various perspectives...

I Am Jesus and the Twelve Disciples: An Interview with Internationally Acclaimed Self-Portrait Photographer, Kayee C.

Between June and October of this year, the NordArt 2023, currently Europe's largest annual contemporary art exhibition, took place in Büdelsdorf, Germany. One name that stood out amidst this creative extravaganza was that of Kayee C., a Hong Kong photographer. Kayee is a portrait photographer renowned for a distinctive approach – she often casts herself as the central figure in her work. While the expectation might be profound revelations like “my art is a reflection of self” or “I meld personal emotions with characters”, her journey started with a simple yet practical reason. She began her photographic voyage in 2015, falling deeply in love with portrait photography. Yet inspiration doesn't always align with model availability. Learning the ropes through self-study, she avoided wa...

50 60 70 (2023, Dir. Sylvia Chang)

In 2004, Sylvia Chang achieved a cinematic milestone with her directorial masterpiece, 20 30 40. This remarkable romantic comedy stands as the singular Chinese-language film selected for competition at the 2004 Berlin International Film Festival. The film masterfully weaves together the distinct yet interconnected stories of three women, each at a different stage of life: Li Hsin-chieh in her twenties, Sylvia Chang herself in her forties, and Renée Liu in her thirties. Through these characters, 20 30 40 eloquently portrays the various struggles and transformations experienced by women across different generations. Now, nearly two decades after its release, 20 30 40 retains its status as a cinematic classic, especially within the realm of women’s cinema. Sylvia Chang’s dual role as dire...

With the Sun, She Quells the Night – A Tribute to Rebecca Pan

When reminiscing about the opulent years of old Shanghai, you might conjure images of the swinging jazz tunes wafting through nightclubs, Chinese classic songs enriched with Western musical arrangements, the lively Charleston dance, and poignant melodies like “When Will You Return” and “Waiting for You to Come Back”. In a serendipitous convergence of seasons, M+ presented an exhibition Madame Song: Pioneering Art and Fashion in China, CHAT (Centre for Heritage, Arts, and Textile) posed an intriguing question: Who is Rebecca Pan? These two Chinese women, both born in the 1930s, had remarkable life stories, one revered as “Madame Song” and the other affectionately referred to as “Sister Pan”. They each held numerous titles: Song Huai Gui was celebrated as the “pioneer of the arts”, a...

【WHY NOT BOLD】Unveiling Miss WoW: The Bold Path to a Sexual Profession (Part 1)

Once upon a time, there lived a girl who was born into a family deeply entrenched in traditional gender biases. Her father's lineage hailed from the mainland, where the desire for a male heir was ingrained in Chinese family culture. During her formative years, she often heard relatives chastising her mother for not producing a son. They'd criticise her mother, saying, “What's the point of earning money if you can't bear a son?” “Why couldn't you have been a son?” Her mother's reproach was cutting. Right from birth, her worth seemed measured by her gender, relegating her to an inferior status. A simmering resentment grew within her. “Why should having a son automatically make someone better? Are boys inherently more capable? Can't I excel just as well as a boy?” Many things pe...

The Genesis of Goddess Portraits : Meet Madame Yevonde

Be original or die. Yevonde Middleton The timeless concept of the “Goddess” endures as a symbol of flawless embodiment and noble beauty. Evolving with the times, the term “Goddess” has been adapted to modern jargon like “KOL” and “internet celebrity”. In the realm of social media, tutorials on effortlessly capturing “Goddess Portraits” have become ubiquitous: guiding girls in striking authentically alluring poses and angles, and offering boys universal photography techniques. While we won't delve into the debate on the validity of this trend today, have you ever wondered about the original progenitor of the “Goddess Portrait”? Meet Yevonde Middleto, sometimes described as an eccentric artist, but revered within her profession as Madame Yevonde. In the 1930s, when the norm f...